Downeast Pride Alliance backs Steve Rowe

(Cross-posted at Augusta Insider)

Gubernatorial candidate Steven Rowe received an endorsement today from the Downeast Pride Alliance. The Downeast Pride Alliance strives to promote LGBT businesses and create a network of LGBT professionals.

The Downeast Pride Alliance had this to say on their endorsement of Steven Rowe:

“I truly believe that no one will work harder for our interest than Steve! As the former Attorney General, Steve has a long history of being a strong advocate for the LGBTQ community. He whole-heartedly supports marriage equality & will work to defeat any repeal efforts. He was critical for us in winning gay adoption and is also a huge supporter of our small business community. At our first event, Steve was with us supporting DEPA a year ago at the Portland Harbor Hotel”.

With this endorsement we can rule out another potential gubernatorial candidate. Sen Dennis Damon, sponsor of LD 1020 (the same-sex marriage bill) would have almost certainly received DEPA’s backing had he chosen to run. DEPA’s endorsement of Rowe will likely strengthen support from his base, giving Rowe an edge in the Democratic primary. Rowe’s gains across all voters will be less, though social conservatives were not a likely group of supporters for Rowe.

Augusta Insider Twitter Update

The Augusta Insider has provided us with the 6th installment of their Gubernatorial Twitter Primary series.

Not a large change from the previous numbers. Matt Jacobson continues to dominate Twitter in number of followers and massive growth. It looks as though the Jacobson will not be giving up his crown as King of Twitter anytime soon.

Newcomer Rosa Scarcelli make an impressive entrance onto the Twitter field. Scarcelli has come right out of the gate with 130 followers, following 131, and 71 tweets. The puts her at the head of the pack in the Dems and third overall. I’m going to give Scarcelli the “Best Start from a Newbie” award.

Here are the current stats from Augusta Insider:

Independent Alex Hammer (@AlexHammer) is following 401, has 337 followers, and 620 Tweets; -31 Followers.

Democrat Dawn Hill (@DawnHillNow) is following 20, has 12 followers, and 1 Tweet.

Republican Matt Jacobson (@jacobson4gov) is following 695, has 968 followers, and 65 Tweets; +214 Followers.

Republican Les Otten (@LesOtten) is following 0, has 40 followers, and 1 Tweets; +10 Followers.

Republican Bruce Poliquin (@BruceForME) is following 85, has 92 followers, and 110 Tweets; -3 Followers.

Democrat Steven Rowe (@Steven_Rowe) is following 0, has 121 followers, and 5 Tweets; +11 Followers.

Democrat Rosa Scarcelli (@rosascarcelli) is following 131, has 130 followers, and 71 Tweets.

Green Independent Lynne Williams (@Lynne4Governor) is following 11, has 38 followers, and 18 Tweets;+2 Followers.

Augusta Insider points out that Peter Mills and Donna Dion are absent from Twitter at this point. Mills cited a Yahoo News Story (TMT Too Much Twitter?) as evidence for why he avoids Twitter. Probably in jest. I’d be surprised if any serious candidate kept away from Twitter entirely at this point.

The Bolt to the Blaine House ’10 – Rosa Scarchelli (D)

Now that she’s announced her candidacy, it’s time to find out what Rosa Scarcelli is all about.

Yesterday I mentioned that the color scheme on Scarcelli’s website were a bit jarring. Not that it has much barring on the election, Matt Gagnon at Pine Tree Politics has an interesting comment on that strange matching of orange and blue.

from Pine Tree Politics:

Scarcelli’s website is a little odd – not because it looks bad (its decent enough), but more because its color scheme looks like something out of a political race in Virginia with its orange and blue accents (something very common down here in my neck of the woods). Usually in Maine you see variations of blue and green – so it looks a tad out of place, but then again should I really be picking on color schemes?

I can hear the shouts already. “She’s from away! She’s from away! Don’t let her within 50 miles of Augusta!” Of course those who would focus on that probably still think Obama is not an American citizens and we never landed on the Moon. Personally I just find it to be an interesting fact, much in the same way I enjoy Mental Floss. Maybe Scarcelli chose the scheme to highlight her difference from the other Democratic contenders, who have all been involved in politics in one way or another. Only she knows for sure.

As Pine Tree Politics points out, Scarcelli is already in the game with a Tweet and Facebook. Scarcelli’s Tweet already has 138 followers and 67 updates, while she is following 123 tweets. Steve Rowe, whose been in this thing for a while now, still only has 114 followers and a meager 3 updates. Democratic challenger Dawn Hill unaccounted for on Twitter. Scarcelli’s Tweet is an interesting blend of the personal and political. Everything from family outings to personal opinions to Maine political news is there. Some of that may sound trivial, but I argue it’s relevant to creating the well rounded image of a real person, not just a face on a poster. For someone who is running as a political outsider Scarcelli is hitting the right buttons with her Tweet.

Steve Rowe still leads in Facebook followers, 616 to Scarcelli’s 247. Though Rowe’s Facebook seems to have a lot of supporter commenting, Scarcelli is using Facebook as another way to present her platform. Scarcelli posts links to articles in MaineBiz, videos of speeches, and other announcements. There isn’t a whole lot to look at yet, but I’m sure that will change.

On to Scarcelli’s credentials.

Scarcelli, like many others in this election, does not come from a political background, but a business one. Scarcelli’s business experience differs from someone like Matt Jacobson or Bruce Poliquin. Jacobson and Poliquin’s experience are in running large organizations and investment in bringing business and jobs to Maine. Scarcelli’s background is rooted in a smaller scale public service business – providing low cost housing to those in need. Is this experience better or preferable than other candidates’ business knowledge? That depends on which voter you talk to. Personally any leadership experience is a plus for a candidate. Then again, how good a leader they actually were cannot be ignored either.

How about Scarcelli’s positions on the issues.

Scarcelli’s recipe for job creation is not all that varied from anything we’ve heard yet. Make Maine business friendly through tax incentives and trim the fat in Augusta, operate more efficiently. Not a bad plan, which is why almost everyone is using it. Scarcelli also advocates a reinvestment and refitting of our current failing industries such as logging and fishing. You’ve got to spend money to make money right.

Scarcelli’s education platform is nothing new either, just maintain current support of K-12. However, her commitment to link community colleges with businesses is interesting. Community colleges should be relevant options for those who don’t wish, or cannot at that time attend a four year school. Linking degree programs directly to employers will give graduates a leg up when they enter the already crowded workforce. And I can’t say I disagree with Scarcelli’s assertion that the UMaine system needs an overhaul.

Energy and environmental issues, though not as power as jobs or the economy, will still play an important role in this election. Scarcelli minces no words on her environmental policy. ” I will accept no compromise when it comes to enforcing our environmental laws and regulations.” ,Scarcelli says on her website. Before you start to think Scarcelli is a Green in disguise, Scarchelli doesn’t reject business over environment. Scarcelli believes job growth and protecting the environment are not mutually exclusive. That is the thrust of Scarcelli’s energy policy as well. “And we can work with the federal government to encourage research and development of alternative energy sources such as offshore wind, solar and tidal energy – part of new green economy that creates jobs in Maine that can’t be shipped overseas.”

There will be a few questions Democrats will need to ask themselves before the upcoming primary: Is Steve Rowe too close to the old guard to win the state or does his experience and name carry him? Is an Augusta outsider a safer bet? Scarcelli could be that outsider Democrats are looking for in their nominee.

That money from "away"

Some Mainers are concerned about things from “away”. Now away could mean that car with out of state plates going the wrong way down State Street. Or it could be someone Southern Maine, the next county, or even the next town over. Away is a relative term.

When it comes to campaign financing, Mainers feelings are just as varied when it comes to money from “away”. To some every outside dollar is an attempt at outside influence on Maine, a swipe at our way of life. That $500 from a New Yorker might as well be another McMansion. Others realize that we are in a global and highly mobile society. Friends, relatives, and business connections we’ve made over the years can easily be spread from coast to coast. If I ran I’d get donations from California, Kentucky, and Massachusetts just to name a few. No matter which opinion you hold, it is a fact that Maine enjoys a great deal of election transparency. Any citizen can pour over the finance reports, looking for whatever they wish.

So today I have complied a few pie charts showing the percent of in state donations versus out of state for each candidate. Enjoy!




That money from "away"

Some Mainers are concerned about things from “away”. Now away could mean that car with out of state plates going the wrong way down State Street. Or it could be someone Southern Maine, the next county, or even the next town over. Away is a relative term.

When it comes to campaign financing, Mainers feelings are just as varied when it comes to money from “away”. To some every outside dollar is an attempt at outside influence on Maine, a swipe at our way of life. That $500 from a New Yorker might as well be another McMansion. Others realize that we are in a global and highly mobile society. Friends, relatives, and business connections we’ve made over the years can easily be spread from coast to coast. If I ran I’d get donations from California, Kentucky, and Massachusetts just to name a few. No matter which opinion you hold, it is a fact that Maine enjoys a great deal of election transparency. Any citizen can pour over the finance reports, looking for whatever they wish.

So today I have complied a few pie charts showing the percent of in state donations versus out of state for each candidate. Enjoy!




Can we fundraise? Can we make graphs? Let’s do it. Break it down!

I thought it would be interesting to check out a breakdown of the recent fundraising totals in the gubernatorial campaign. Today I’ve done them by each month. A couple notes on my graph. I’ve combined January, February, and March. Only Poliquin and Williams noted money in the first two months. This may give Poliquin a bit of a skewed total for the first three months, but bare in mind that the other candidates posted little or no numbers for Jan and Feb. Also I did not include Poliquin’s $100,000 self donation to his campaign in these numbers. Despite the fact that you cannot discount this money in the race and it is the candidate’s choice to reach into their own wallet, I wanted the graph to give everyone an idea of the early fundraising power of the candidates. So here it is. Discuss.


As the Augusta Insider has said, even without his self-donation, Bruce Poliquin has trumped his competitors in fundraising. That is something you cannot deny. Poliquin credits his early fundraising victory to his campaign team. “It’s really a testament to a lot of hard work by our team. We’ve attracted broad support from Mainers who believe our next Governor should have deep roots in this state and a background in business and finance.” ,Poliquin stated on his website.

But even Poliquin had to admit that this was only round one. Poliquin’s chief Republican competition, Matt Jacobson kept close to Poliquin in April and May fundraising totals, but fell behind in the June dash for cash. Jacobson announced his totals yesterday through his Tweet. According to the fundraising report at Pine Tree Politics, the Jacobson Campaign is focusing its early effort on getting the word out. They are hoping to build a strong momentum which will allow them to sail past Poliquin to the Republican nomination.

Steve Rowe made an impressive showing in June. Rowe raised the second highest total for the period, half of Poliquin’s take. Still $59,000 is not chump change, especially for only one month.

Again we shouldn’t forget that this is only the beginning folks. Campaigns are just out of the gate. Over the next four months we should see the cream begin to rise to the top.

Tomorrow – Out of state vs In state donations.

Can we fundraise? Can we make graphs? Let’s do it. Break it down!

I thought it would be interesting to check out a breakdown of the recent fundraising totals in the gubernatorial campaign. Today I’ve done them by each month. A couple notes on my graph. I’ve combined January, February, and March. Only Poliquin and Williams noted money in the first two months. This may give Poliquin a bit of a skewed total for the first three months, but bare in mind that the other candidates posted little or no numbers for Jan and Feb. Also I did not include Poliquin’s $100,000 self donation to his campaign in these numbers. Despite the fact that you cannot discount this money in the race and it is the candidate’s choice to reach into their own wallet, I wanted the graph to give everyone an idea of the early fundraising power of the candidates. So here it is. Discuss.


As the Augusta Insider has said, even without his self-donation, Bruce Poliquin has trumped his competitors in fundraising. That is something you cannot deny. Poliquin credits his early fundraising victory to his campaign team. “It’s really a testament to a lot of hard work by our team. We’ve attracted broad support from Mainers who believe our next Governor should have deep roots in this state and a background in business and finance.” ,Poliquin stated on his website.

But even Poliquin had to admit that this was only round one. Poliquin’s chief Republican competition, Matt Jacobson kept close to Poliquin in April and May fundraising totals, but fell behind in the June dash for cash. Jacobson announced his totals yesterday through his Tweet. According to the fundraising report at Pine Tree Politics, the Jacobson Campaign is focusing its early effort on getting the word out. They are hoping to build a strong momentum which will allow them to sail past Poliquin to the Republican nomination.

Steve Rowe made an impressive showing in June. Rowe raised the second highest total for the period, half of Poliquin’s take. Still $59,000 is not chump change, especially for only one month.

Again we shouldn’t forget that this is only the beginning folks. Campaigns are just out of the gate. Over the next four months we should see the cream begin to rise to the top.

Tomorrow – Out of state vs In state donations.