Lynne Williams Interview

Lynne Williams on clean elections, tax reform, and Maine’s Green Party Continue reading

Anna Trevorrow Interview

Green Party Chair Anna Trevorrow on clean elections, tax reform, and the Maine Green’s future Continue reading

Maine Greens Ready to Rumble

(Cross-posted @Augusta Insider)

Over the past few months the Maine Green Independent Party has locked horns with the Democrats on many issues. The Maine Greens have opposed recent changes to the Maine Clean Election Fund requirements and joined with the Maine GOP in speaking out against the recent tax reforms. Though the Greens have been active in Maine for some time they haven’t had anyone in Augusta since John Eder left in 2006. The Greens are working hard to prove they are a viable alternative to Maine’s Democrats.

Continue reading

A little island causes a big stir

A new development project is coming to Sears Island. The little island off Searsport in Waldo County could be home to three hundred acres of industrial development if plans go through, with six hundred under protection. Governors have pushed for Sears Island, the largest undeveloped, uninhabited, causeway accessible island on the east coast, to be the home of many developments. Joseph Brennan and John McKernan advocated Sears Island be used as a general port. Angus King promoted its use as a wood chip port, while Governor Baldacci pushed for an LNG terminal and an intermodal freight transport hub on the island. Continue reading

Maine women could break gubernatorial glass ceiling

Susan Cover at the Kennebec Journal/Maine Sentinel pointed out an interesting statistic that I had never stopped to consider. Maine has never had a woman governor. Maine is one of twenty-seven states and one of only two New England states (Rhode Island being the other) to have never elected a woman as governor.

This election could, as Cover points out, make history. At this point the list of female candidates includes three Democrats (Donna Dion, Dawn Hill, and Rosa Scarcelli) and one Green Party candidate (Lynne Williams).

Augusta Insider Twitter Update

The Augusta Insider has provided us with the 6th installment of their Gubernatorial Twitter Primary series.

Not a large change from the previous numbers. Matt Jacobson continues to dominate Twitter in number of followers and massive growth. It looks as though the Jacobson will not be giving up his crown as King of Twitter anytime soon.

Newcomer Rosa Scarcelli make an impressive entrance onto the Twitter field. Scarcelli has come right out of the gate with 130 followers, following 131, and 71 tweets. The puts her at the head of the pack in the Dems and third overall. I’m going to give Scarcelli the “Best Start from a Newbie” award.

Here are the current stats from Augusta Insider:

Independent Alex Hammer (@AlexHammer) is following 401, has 337 followers, and 620 Tweets; -31 Followers.

Democrat Dawn Hill (@DawnHillNow) is following 20, has 12 followers, and 1 Tweet.

Republican Matt Jacobson (@jacobson4gov) is following 695, has 968 followers, and 65 Tweets; +214 Followers.

Republican Les Otten (@LesOtten) is following 0, has 40 followers, and 1 Tweets; +10 Followers.

Republican Bruce Poliquin (@BruceForME) is following 85, has 92 followers, and 110 Tweets; -3 Followers.

Democrat Steven Rowe (@Steven_Rowe) is following 0, has 121 followers, and 5 Tweets; +11 Followers.

Democrat Rosa Scarcelli (@rosascarcelli) is following 131, has 130 followers, and 71 Tweets.

Green Independent Lynne Williams (@Lynne4Governor) is following 11, has 38 followers, and 18 Tweets;+2 Followers.

Augusta Insider points out that Peter Mills and Donna Dion are absent from Twitter at this point. Mills cited a Yahoo News Story (TMT Too Much Twitter?) as evidence for why he avoids Twitter. Probably in jest. I’d be surprised if any serious candidate kept away from Twitter entirely at this point.

Irregular Times questions Patrick Quinlan’s seriousness


In a post last week the Irregular Times questioned if Green Party candidate Patrick Quinlan is actually serious about his run for governor. When you compare what he has done so far with the legwork that Lynne Williams has been putting in the answer, as Irregular Times points out, becomes clear.

from Irregular Times:

Williams has a campaign website that solicits donors and volunteers. She has an active Facebook group and (although I don’t understand the need for or substance of this) twitters about campaign activities as well.

Lynne Williams has submitted her July 2009 Pre-Election Semiannual campaign finance report, which was released to the public this afternoon. The report shows 31 contributions of more than $50, none more than $100, including Tom Hayden (yes, that Tom Hayden).

Patrick Quinlan has a website, but that website makes no mention of him running for public office (the website promotes his three novels and one co-written memoir). Quinlan’s MySpace page similarly makes no mention of a gubernatorial run. A blog of his mentions him “thinking about running for Governor of Maine” and “whether I ultimately run for Governor or not,” as late as June 23 of this year, long after Lynne Williams’ campaign was effectively up and running. Quinlan’s required Pre-Election Semiannual campaign finance report has not yet been posted.

There’s a lot of time left in the 2010 election cycle, but judging by the status of candidacies today, it looks as though there may be just one major Green Party candidate for Governor of Maine in 2010.

It’s true. I tried my damnedest a while back to write something about Quinlan, but there just isn’t anything out there. Unless you are curious about his most recent tome that is. Quinlan does have a blog, with two posts; one about his book and the other about peak oil.

Maybe Quinlan is just hanging back, seeing what moves his competitors make first. A little strategery maybe? My gut tells me Williams can probably put away the Pepto and relax.

That money from "away"

Some Mainers are concerned about things from “away”. Now away could mean that car with out of state plates going the wrong way down State Street. Or it could be someone Southern Maine, the next county, or even the next town over. Away is a relative term.

When it comes to campaign financing, Mainers feelings are just as varied when it comes to money from “away”. To some every outside dollar is an attempt at outside influence on Maine, a swipe at our way of life. That $500 from a New Yorker might as well be another McMansion. Others realize that we are in a global and highly mobile society. Friends, relatives, and business connections we’ve made over the years can easily be spread from coast to coast. If I ran I’d get donations from California, Kentucky, and Massachusetts just to name a few. No matter which opinion you hold, it is a fact that Maine enjoys a great deal of election transparency. Any citizen can pour over the finance reports, looking for whatever they wish.

So today I have complied a few pie charts showing the percent of in state donations versus out of state for each candidate. Enjoy!




That money from "away"

Some Mainers are concerned about things from “away”. Now away could mean that car with out of state plates going the wrong way down State Street. Or it could be someone Southern Maine, the next county, or even the next town over. Away is a relative term.

When it comes to campaign financing, Mainers feelings are just as varied when it comes to money from “away”. To some every outside dollar is an attempt at outside influence on Maine, a swipe at our way of life. That $500 from a New Yorker might as well be another McMansion. Others realize that we are in a global and highly mobile society. Friends, relatives, and business connections we’ve made over the years can easily be spread from coast to coast. If I ran I’d get donations from California, Kentucky, and Massachusetts just to name a few. No matter which opinion you hold, it is a fact that Maine enjoys a great deal of election transparency. Any citizen can pour over the finance reports, looking for whatever they wish.

So today I have complied a few pie charts showing the percent of in state donations versus out of state for each candidate. Enjoy!




Can we fundraise? Can we make graphs? Let’s do it. Break it down!

I thought it would be interesting to check out a breakdown of the recent fundraising totals in the gubernatorial campaign. Today I’ve done them by each month. A couple notes on my graph. I’ve combined January, February, and March. Only Poliquin and Williams noted money in the first two months. This may give Poliquin a bit of a skewed total for the first three months, but bare in mind that the other candidates posted little or no numbers for Jan and Feb. Also I did not include Poliquin’s $100,000 self donation to his campaign in these numbers. Despite the fact that you cannot discount this money in the race and it is the candidate’s choice to reach into their own wallet, I wanted the graph to give everyone an idea of the early fundraising power of the candidates. So here it is. Discuss.


As the Augusta Insider has said, even without his self-donation, Bruce Poliquin has trumped his competitors in fundraising. That is something you cannot deny. Poliquin credits his early fundraising victory to his campaign team. “It’s really a testament to a lot of hard work by our team. We’ve attracted broad support from Mainers who believe our next Governor should have deep roots in this state and a background in business and finance.” ,Poliquin stated on his website.

But even Poliquin had to admit that this was only round one. Poliquin’s chief Republican competition, Matt Jacobson kept close to Poliquin in April and May fundraising totals, but fell behind in the June dash for cash. Jacobson announced his totals yesterday through his Tweet. According to the fundraising report at Pine Tree Politics, the Jacobson Campaign is focusing its early effort on getting the word out. They are hoping to build a strong momentum which will allow them to sail past Poliquin to the Republican nomination.

Steve Rowe made an impressive showing in June. Rowe raised the second highest total for the period, half of Poliquin’s take. Still $59,000 is not chump change, especially for only one month.

Again we shouldn’t forget that this is only the beginning folks. Campaigns are just out of the gate. Over the next four months we should see the cream begin to rise to the top.

Tomorrow – Out of state vs In state donations.