The Bolt to the Blaine House ’10 – Bruce Poliquin (R)

Yesterday I covered Independent candidate for governor Alex Hammer. Today it’s the GOP’s turn. I’ll examine Bruce Poliquin.

A special note – It may seem that I have been much harder on Poliquin than I was yesterday with Hammer. This is only because Poliquin had more information available for me to pick apart. It is in no way an endorsement of one over the other at this point.

Bruce Poliquin is one of two GOP candidates at this point. Poliquin is not going to be left behind on the internet superhighway. He already has a decent website, facebook, and twitter. The majority of his platform seems like it could belong to any Republican candidate for governor in Maine. Lower taxes? Check. Less regulation of business? Check. Curb state spending? Check. Poliquin is even so bold as to state that education needs to be made a top priority! I never expected a politician to support education in such an unique way. OK maybe I’m being a little cynical. I’m 27. In my short amount of political experience I have never heard a politician not make education a “top priority”.

Before I’m accused of Bruce bashing, let me break down a few points of his platform. The highlight of Poliquin’s platform so far is his Plan to Help Maine Families. Poliquin’s plan contains ten points to address what’s ailing Vacationland.

from Bruceforme:

  1. Lower Taxes to National Averages or Less.
  2. Create Positive Attitude Toward Business Development and Jobs.
  3. Carefully Reduce State Spending to National Averages or Less.
  4. Reform State Programs to Do More With Less.
  5. Promote Competition Among Health Care Insurance Companies to Lower Premium Costs.
  6. Improve Education System to Better Prepare Students for College and Beyond.
  7. Simplify Business Regulations to Create New Jobs.
  8. Complete Infrastructure to Enhance Our Quality of Life.
  9. Explore Ways to Lower Energy Costs.
  10. Protect Our Environment while Promoting Job Creation.

Though not as bad off as our Massachusetts cousins, Maine taxes have been above the national average for some time. While the national average tax burden is 9.7%, Maine’s is 10%. Of course the median household income here is $44,000, about the same as the national average. Lowering taxes will certainly win some voters. Will it be practical when our infrastructure is crumbling? Maine’s infrastructure grade is a C- overall. Maine roads received a D and bridges a D+. That is beyond scary. There is a $400 million gap in funding for Maine DOT bridge repair. Not to mention that the ASCE labeled 17 Maine dams high public hazards and 153 significant to high hazards. Add to that numbers 6 (improve education) and 8 (complete infrastructure) and lower taxes seems more and more difficult to accomplish. In all honesty, I don’t think lowering Maine taxes to the national average is a poor goal. It would have to be coupled with large spending cuts, especially considering the cuts Maine had to make just to balance the budget recently.

Number 2 (creating a positive attitude toward business) is important for Maine at this juncture. Governors have tried to court companies into the state for some time. Their approach has been flawed. It has been too narrow. Governors have focused on getting this particular business or that one. The whole time they have neglected the broader business picture. Maine should open itself up to businesses of all types, not just existing industries or things like phone centers. Diversifying Maine’s economy is the only way for the state to proceed forward and to stop the flood of Maine’s graduates from the state.

How does Poliquin plan to do this? Well his recipe is not innovative.

from Bruceforme:
To attract businesses and jobs we must: tax less, spend wisely, simplify regulations, lower energy and healthcare costs, complete our infrastructure, and improve education. Some initiatives can be implemented relatively soon. Others are longer-term. It will take common sense, hard work, and competent management. For all of us who call Maine home, it will be worth it.

Poliquin’s solutions to taxation (across the board cuts), spending (cutting wasteful programs), regulations (streamline and simplify), energy costs (pursue alternative energy & upgrade grid with Canada) and healthcare costs (strong reforms) are a mix of Republican staples moderated with a generally liberal concern for the environment. Comparisons between the politics of Poliquin and Senators Snowe and Collins are sure to come. Will that link be enough for Poliquin to get to the Blaine House? To win his parties nomination for even the chance? It’s far too early to tell. Without more specifics I can’t say either. I will say a Republican that is not as least as moderate as Poliquin seems to be will last as long as a lobster at a tourist trap on Route 1 in this election

Tomorrow: Lynne Williams (G)

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